BACK

EXHIBITION

K2 Naoki Ishikawa Photo Exhibition

© Naoki Ishikawa

© Naoki Ishikawa

2015.12.5 SAT - 12.27 SUN

12:00 - 20:00 Open daily / Free admission

INTRODUCTION

In 2001, at the age of 23, Naoki Ishikawa scaled Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain, and in 2011 he again succeeded in reaching the peak of Mount Everest, this time from a different route. He also succeeded in reaching the tops of Manaslu (8,163m) in 2012, Lhotse (8,516m) in 2013, and Makalu (8,463m) in 2014, the whole time photographing under extreme conditions as he scaled these high peaks that defy humans every year.

This summer Ishikawa headed for K2, the world’s second highest peak and one of the most difficult mountains to climb. In addition to its towering height of 8,611m, K2 is considered to be the most treacherous mountains to climb in the range of 8,000m, due to the difficulty of the route and severe weather conditions of this single-peak mountain.
He stayed in Karakoram for two months, a world consisting of only rocks, snow, and ice. The new works he had taken there will be featured in the exhibition.

ARTIST

Naoki Ishikawa

Born in Tokyo in 1977, Naoki Ishikawa completed his fine arts doctoral degree at Tokyo University of the Arts Graduate School. Interested in areas such as anthropology and folklore, he has continued to show his work while traveling widely from remote regions to cities around the world. His works New Dimension (AKAAKA Art Publishing Inc.) and Polar (Little More Co., Ltd.) won him the Newcomer’s Award from the Photographic Society of Japan, and his work Corona (Seidosha, Inc.) the Domon Ken Award. He has published numerous books including Saigo-no-Bokenka (The Last Adventurer) (Shueisha Inc.), which won the Takeshi Kaiko Nonfiction Prize. He has made a four-volume photographic series of works; Lhotse, Qomolangma, Manaslu and Makalu (SLANT), focusing on the 8,000m peaks of the Himalayas. His latest works include KunisakiHanto (KunisakiPenisula) and Kami (Hair) (Seidosha, Inc.).
http://www.straightree.com/

REPORT